Performance Matters: 4 Ways To Leverage Net Zero Energy In Building Products Marketing

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Name one of the key aspects of sustainability that’s most appealing to a broad audience. Give up? It’s simple: Performance. And let’s be honest—this is what customers really want. So it’s up to you to find ways to leverage your products’ performance features because ultimately this translates to customer value.

A core piece of the sustainability puzzle is energy efficiency—and the multitude of ways you can maximize it. Important sought-after performance metrics include reductions in energy costs and carbon footprints of buildings—for both new and retrofit projects.

Ironically, you make the most impact when you make zero impact on the environment. One way to make a greater impact with your customers is to show them how your products help their end users achieve a zero sum where energy is concerned.

Focus on net zero
A growing trend in the building industry is zero energy building, or ZEB, solutions. A Navigant Research report anticipates worldwide revenue from ZEBs will increase exponentially from $629 million a year in 2014 to more than $1.4 trillion by 2035.

These solutions, including everything from photovoltaic cells to sustainable landscaping, gather up existing energy technologies to produce a high-performance building that uses the same amount of energy it produces in a year’s time.

In addition to the potential for energy savings, government regulations are also helping to fuel this growth. In California, for example, amendments to Title 24 mandate that by 2020 all residential buildings must be zero net energy (ZNE) and all commercial buildings must be ZNE by 2030. This also applies to retrofit projects.

Find your niche

Despite its potential for growth, challenges still remain. The definition of what exactly constitutes a ZEB remains elusive, and getting the word out about how accessible these solutions are continues to be slow going.

So how do you plan to take part in the net zero energy revolution and become a net zero energy hero? Here are four ways to promote your company’s role in net zero building:

1. Get definitive.
Since the definition of net zero varies as well as the types of ZEBs, it’s important to identify what types of zero energy buildings your products support. You’ll offer your customers a clearer picture of your value offering. However, remember to stay loose because the definitions surrounding net zero continue to evolve.

2. Join forces.
Partner and collaborate with organizations that share your same philosophy about net zero energy. Identify companies you’ve worked on projects with—and continue to work with—that are just as committed to energy efficiency in the built environment. You’ll expand your organization’s capabilities and offerings plus demonstrate great environmental stewardship.

3. Share best practices.
Develop case studies that show successful implementation of your products—particularly those that highlight partnerships and share them with your customers. They love it when your products play well with others and can get a good idea of how they’ll perform.

4. Educate inside and out.
Make sure both your internal and external customers are well informed. Continually keep your internal customers up to speed on new developments in ZEB solutions so your offerings stay relevant. Work to ensure that your external customers are regularly updated on your ZEB technology offerings. Staying current and helping your customers do the same increases the likelihood that you become the go-to source for knowledge—and repeat business.

Let your customers know exactly how your building products lend themselves to net zero energy savings. You’ll be poised to be a part of exponential growth and to offer exceptional value and performance to your customers.

 

Photo credit: via photopin photo credit:”http://www.flickr.com/photos/80824546@N00/6908728162

Why Locally Sourced Building Products Make a Difference to Customers

5046595262_63441f95f1_oYour customers now live in a society where people’s relationship to their environment truly matters. This means a growing number of people are paying more attention to how everything impacts their communities. By promoting your locally sourced building products and materials, you show your company’s commitment to community investments in the future and the active role you’ll take.

Sustainable buildings and spaces factor in the entire life cycle of the construction process. The amount of energy it takes to make and transport materials is almost as critical as the selection of materials and the building process itself. Materials and products vary in the amount of energy they require for production, as do various transportation modes. For example, ocean and rail shipping are the least energy-intensive while aircraft is the most.

When transportation contributes to pollution, it affects public health. When you reduce transportation and lower energy use, emissions that cause climate change are also lowered. Building materials sourced locally mean shorter trips to haul, lower diesel fuel consumption and less greenhouse gas emissions. This presents an important marketing opportunity for you as a building products manufacturer.

Point out to customers that often times local materials and products can be less expensive, “greener,” very unique aesthetically and help keep the local economy afloat. Let’s also not forget that locally sourced products and materials are excellent for retrofit projects as well. These materials can easily be used in more traditional construction.

Here are four more reasons why locally sourced building products matter:

Transparency pays and consumers want the truth. With questionable ethics rampant in food production and mass production in general, consumers are rightfully concerned about what not only goes into their bodies, but the health of their living spaces. With that comes the desire to know where the products they’re living with come from. Having traceable products that boost the local economy engenders trust. Trust engenders loyalty.

Solid community bonds are forged. Making your community’s needs a priority with locally sourced product and materials ties you more closely to the community. Local material use can support the economy and foster connections with the community. The community then recognizes that you share its vision for sustainability and builds a deeper connection with your brand.

You are perceived as a responsible corporate citizen. When you share that you use locally sourced materials and products, it shows the community that you care about the health, quality and safety standards of your products, the surrounding environment where these materials are used and those who use your products. You’re now viewed as “one of the good guys.”

It’s a hallmark of quality. Consumers are seeking out that “made in the USA” label in hopes of finding quality. Use of local materials celebrates tradition and a simpler time when “homegrown” was preferred. It lets people know your company is authentic, and authenticity ups your street cred.

By educating your customers on your locally sourced offerings, you integrate community engagement into your brand’s identity while demonstrating the value of sustainability.

Photo credit:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/54359128@N00/5046595262

The 411 on LEED in Green Building Product Marketing

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMarketers seeking to have building products applied to the LEED® Rating System need to have a thorough understanding of the system, the credits that apply to their products and the certification process as a whole. 

The green building industry continues to grow because of environmental concerns, tax subsidies, savings in operational costs and the rising popularity of LEED.

According to Environmental Leader/Environment & Energy Management News, there are 17,434 certified commercial and institutional projects, representing 2.3 billion square feet. There are also another 29,599 registered (pursuing LEED but not yet certified) projects, representing 4.4 billion square feet.

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, is a set of building rating systems for buildings of all types – commercial, residential and neighborhood communities. It works throughout the building lifecycle–design and construction, operations and maintenance, tenant fitout and significant retrofit.

The five rating systems address multiple project types, such as:

  • Building design and construction
  • Interior design and construction
  • Building operations and maintenance
  • Neighborhood development
  • Homes

LEED was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council and is intended to help building owners use resources more efficiently when compared to conventional buildings. LEED certification provides third-party verification that a building was designed and built using strategies aimed at achieving high performance in:

  • Sustainable sites
  • Water efficiency
  • Energy and atmosphere
  • Materials and resources
  • Indoor environmental quality
  • Innovation

Although building materials play a fairly substantial role within the LEED Rating System, LEED does not certify green building products. It certifies buildings. To receive certification, building projects must satisfy prerequisites and earn points to achieve one of the four levels of certification–certified, silver, gold and platinum.

The majority of building products will contribute to achieving LEED points through performance-based requirements. Some points will necessitate assessing the aggregate environmental or health value of a set of products and other points will require that certain limits or minimums be met.

In November 2013, the most recent update to the rating systems launched, LEED v4. This version allows for a wider range of building types and manufacturing industries. It also encourages optimization of energy and water use and furthers environmental issues like climate change.

Category5 CEO and owner Lori Malone is a LEED® Green Associate. The GBCI (Green Building Certification Institute) awards these nationally recognized certifications to confirm that an individual demonstrates knowledge and understanding of green building practices and principles needed to support the use of the LEED® Green Building Rating System.

Photo credit: Daniel Lobo via flickr

View the complete LEED Rating System.

View the entire list of credit categories.

Why Healthy Living Spaces Should Matter to Building Products Marketers

Oct 1 Healthy Living SpacesIf your goal is wellness (and whose isn’t?), you know eating healthy food and exercising are a big part of the equation. It’s just as important, however, to make sure the space you live in is healthy for you.   

To find out what healthy living spaces really mean and why they are a win-win for both consumers and green building products manufacturers, CMO-Scan spoke to Jillian Pritchard Cooke, founder of the Wellness Within Your Walls concept, and president of Atlanta-based interior design firm DES-SYN.

Q: Why did you feel Wellness Within Your Walls was important to bring to life now?

A: The [Wellness Within Your Walls] program has been in the planning stages for about eight years. DES-SYN was involved in the first LEED Certified Gold home in the country. Our first clients were husband and wife Laura Turner Seydel (Ted Turner’s daughter) and Rutherford Seydel and building what is now EcoManor.

Laura was interested in the design and function of the space. Rutherford was interested in the systems such as the geothermal, solar panels, and graywater systems with a desire to have them be the best they could be.

While working on this project, I also was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer so I began to think about the toxic side of building and decided to champion the healthier side of building. LEED was big at the time, and there were conflicting choices related to health, which were overwhelming to consumers. I decided to try to simplify the information, and that’s been a real focus—simplifying information from the manufacturer, the builder and the designer to the consumer.

Q: How has Wellness Within Your Walls impacted how you do business?

A: EcoManor met the LEED certification program requirements. We were very creative in the design and execution of the home to garnish additional points to meet the gold level status.

One challenge we had was that LEED deducts points for spaces over 5,000 square feet. The Seydels, a family of five, wanted to accommodate visiting guests and their family, and in order to do so, they built the house to be greater than 5,000 square feet.

We purposefully filled the home with healthy, non-toxic furnishings and interior building materials that told the story on how to reduce harmful toxins. Those purposeful choices helped us reach LEED Gold level. Marilyn Black from GreenGuard was instrumental. She worked closely with the Seydels and our design team to ensure that formaldehyde and other toxin levels erred on the side of safe.

At the time of installation, we used AMF Safecoat low-VOC paint. (Shortly after the installation many other paints became available that were no-VOC). EcoManor became the genesis of Wellness Within Your Walls (WWYW). Now our clients request that we design to the WWYW standard. This has increased our business exponentially.

Q: What lesson or takeaway is there from this model for building products marketers?

A: We’ve created four CEU (continuing education unit) credit courses available through IIDA and ASID that fall under the health and safety heading of the CEU courses. Anyone can take the four courses, which is followed by a test. If you pass, then you’re eligible for WWYW designation.

The intent is that manufacturers of home building products and furnishings would adhere to producing natural products free of toxins, sustainable products free of toxins or produce products in a responsible way, by using transparency, accountability, safety data sheets, and adequate labeling. Labeling relates to, for example, if you bring a product in your home with chemicals, what are the off-gassing procedures you should put in place so toxins don’t come into the home environment?

Q: Do you personally practice what you preach?

A: I live in a 100-year-old, 2,100 square foot house with hardwood floors. I have no pesticides in the garden so my pets don’t bring it in the house with them when they come inside. I clean with non-toxic cleaning materials. I believe in steaming to reduce germs. I believe in fresh air so all the windows in the house are operable. I have additional ventilation systems to reduce dust mites at different times of the year. I only burn soy and beeswax candles, and we clean our vents regularly. In addition, I use no-VOC paints and off-gas before I bring anything into our home.

Q: How are you expanding your Wellness Within Your Walls concept into the community?

A: We have set a goal of 50 states in 500 days. We are educating builders, contractors and designers through IIDA, ASID and NAHB. This is an organized, requested event that takes place in major cities. So far, we have already taught in Dallas; Atlanta; Charlotte, N.C.; and we’re going to Asheville, N.C. We’re also setting up dates in Louisiana, Chicago and New York. We are looking for ambassadors for the national program. As an ambassador, if you help WWYW plan the event, you can sit in on our four CEU classes at no cost and get your WWYW designation.

The response to this tour has been good. Retailers have been excited, wanting to fill their shops with products that meet the standards. We have also partnered with the Sustainable Furnishing Council (SFC), the NAHB, the UL GreenGuard certification program and other organizations concerned with sustainability that have a health platform. Our program offerings are solution-based and hinge on research-based programs.

Q: What do you feel is the next step for building product marketers with regard to your three categories of Natural, Sustainable and Responsible?

A: I think we are starting to see transparency, and with that comes accountability and proper labeling. I don’t think this is any different than the farm to table movement, where the consumers asked for it and the food industry responded.

The same applies to the building products industry. Consumers have asked for it, and home building manufacturers have no choice but to respond to the demand. Given a choice between a product that doesn’t disclose what it’s made of vs. products that do disclose and how to mediate and mitigate toxins makes them solution-based, and that’s what consumers are looking for.

Building products manufacturers all have choices as it relates to producing products that are safe, which is socially responsible.

Photo credit:  thinkstock.com

Why the Marriage of Solar Panels and Metal Roofing Matters to Building Product Marketing

AugustBlog1Happiness, for most homeowners, means never having to replace your roof—or any other part of your home, for that matter. Realistically, that’s simply not possible.

What is possible, however, is helping your sustainably focused customers maximize efficiency, recognize how to get the longest service life possible out of their roofs and identify overall cost savings. A great way to do that is to educate your customers on the advantages of metal roofing particularly when they are also considering adding solar panels, also known as a photovoltaic (PV) system.

According to the Metal Roofing Alliance, 5 million new roofs are installed annually, with 47 percent of U.S. households willing to consider metal roofing. Although metal roofing is the No. 2 roofing choice behind asphalt shingles, it offers far more value, particularly when paired with a PV system.

Dynamic duo

The energy and life cycle cost savings your customers can potentially realize with PV systems that use solar panels on metal roofing are tremendous. More and more green-conscious customers are looking toward PV systems as an efficient heating and cooling solution that captures free, renewable energy. Customers can realize significant savings on energy bills with these systems—up to 40 percent in the summertime, for example.

PV systems also offer customers low life cycle costs. On average, these systems have a service life of 30-plus years. When marrying PV panels to a metal roof, the service life is extended even further.

That’s because a properly installed metal retrofit roof can last up to six decades. That means PV systems can even be installed on 8- to 10-year-old metal roofs since the service life of the average metal roof (40-60 years) is longer than the life of most PV systems. In contrast, conventional asphalt shingle roofs have a service life of 15 to 25 years.

For those customers who need a new roof and are also planning to add a PV system, going with metal can make a lot of sense—and cents.

Why metal?

Although upfront costs for metal roofing are higher, it’s still a sound investment for your customers, and it’s important that they understand this. Metal roofing affords customers a list of long-term savings, including:

  • Low to no maintenance
  • Harsh weather resistance, including wind and fire resistance
  • No need to tear off the existing roofs in most cases

Metal roofing also contributes to greater efficiency and lower cost since it’s able to lower air temperature by 12° F, which means your customers:

  • Spend less money on utilities
  • Depend less on energy resources
  • Reduce general air pollution

As an added bonus, since metal roofing can often be added to existing roofing, less materials end up in landfills. When a metal roof reaches the end of its useful life, it can be recycled, since many of the panels of a metal roof are largely made up of recyclable content.

Encourage your customers to consider metal roofing and a PV system as a single asset. Then have them consider the total life cycle cost of ownership over the life of this asset. The market is primed and your customers are ready and willing to listen. All that’s left for you to do is show them why the metal roof and the PV system really are the perfect couple.

Photo credit:  Thinkstock.com

How Retrofit Benefits Your Building Product Marketing

shutterstock_117276403Your customers likely already understand that a green building approach, and meeting LEED standards, will result in high-performance building systems that can yield significant cost savings.

When it comes to greening existing buildings, however, most customers will automatically assume needed improvements will be cost-prohibitive. What those customers don’t realize is that projects requiring retrofits, system upgrades or renovations can be great for business when a “paid-from-savings” approach is taken.

Getting paid from savings

A paid-from-savings approach simply means an organization can use utilize cost savings gained through building improvements to pay for green building retrofit projects.

In fact, payback time for green investments on green retrofit projects is just four years vs. seven years for a new green building, according to McGraw-Hill Construction’s 2013 World Green Building Trends SmartMarket Report. Other benefits to be gained include:

  • Lower operating costs
  • Increased asset value of building
  • Reduced environmental impact
  • Occupant productivity and health improvements

Show, don’t tell

So what are you doing to educate your customers and show them how your products can best meet their green retrofit project needs? Ordinarily, your customers may turn to industry associations to find more information about green trends and product information, but they would welcome an alternate resource for insights gleaned from successful projects.

The 2013 SmartMarket Report also revealed the two most effective ways for companies to get the word out about their products’ green attributes – case studies and lifecycle data.

  • Sharing case studies that demonstrate how your products meet and exceed green industry standards and showcasing your products’ green benefits in a compelling manner are great ways to capture your customers’ attention and earn their trust. Case studies should talk about the challenges and recommendations you made as well as concrete results those customers achieved by using your products thereby proving their effectiveness to other customers.
  • Lifecycle data, when available, reflects the full impact of the product – from its production all the way to installation. The analysis and combination of this data enable you to provide customers with a comprehensive picture of product benefits.

Green retrofit projects address financial, environmental and even social benefits that comprise the “triple bottom line.” Taking the initiative to educate your customers on the business benefits of green retrofit will enable everyone to realize not only the opportunities and paybacks now but also enduring benefits going forward into the future.

Photo credit:  Shutterstock

Marketing Building Products: Top Ranked Green Products for Architects & Engineers

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Greening codes are driving the AE’s need to find new sustainable solutions from building products manufacturers.

To earn buyers’ trust and get specified in the built environment, manufacturers must address three key points:

  1. Product Safety
  2. Environmental Benefits
  3. Return On Investment.

Often the upfront costs of building green cost more on both sides of the transaction – manufacturers and buyers.  It’s imperative that you prove return on investment and the life cycle costs of your product.

Stay informed about code trends and changes and take the first step in assessing the sustainability of your products. A clear understanding of what intrinsic green qualities your product offering already has and what opportunities are viable for your product in the future is the key to success and continued relevancy with your buyer.

Get inspired and learn from two leading sustainable publishers, BuildingGreen and Inhabit.

BuildingGreen, is an independent publishing company committed to providing accurate, unbiased and timely green design information.  BuildingGreen also publishes Environmental Building News, BuildingGreen Suite online tools, GreenSpec directory of products, and LEEDuser web tools.

Inhabit is a weblog devoted to the future of design, tracking the innovations in technology, practices and materials that are pushing architecture and home design towards a smarter and more sustainable future.

Here are my favorites chosen from these editors’ top picks at this year’s USGBC Greenbuild Conference – the source for the most innovative green building products.

Concrete

Atlas CMU block with CarbonCure

Atlas CarbonCure Block is a new concrete product engineered to significantly reduce concrete’s carbon footprint. In addition to cleaner emissions, CarbonCure improves strength, reduces the amount of concrete required for a project, and speeds the curing process.

Lighting and Daylighting

  • Parans uses Fresnel lenses and fiber optics to move sunlight indoors. The box traces the sun which feeds fiber optic wires bringing sunlight indoors. Parens will provide ample light for a typical room for most of the day.
  • Tensotherm is an innovative translucent architecture canvas that contains an aerogel mat at its core. The material can be used to create a white roof that allows a lot of light in while still achieving an R-30 rating.
  • XS-P Series streetlight from Cree Lighting: LED outdoor street and area lights provide better visibility and energy savings. The XS-P is affordable, with a payback of as little as three years, yet it is compatible with dimming drivers and is available with optional occupancy sensors, remote monitoring, and other lighting controls.

Windows

  • LoE-i89 glazing from Cardinal Glass Industries: A new coating from Cardinal Glass is a sputtered indium tin oxide hard-coat that can be installed on an exposed surface allowing two low-e coatings on a double-glazed window to perform like a triple-glazed window.  High light transference makes the coating perfect for solar gain applications.
  • Pythagorus Solar Windows: An interesting marriage of solar electric cells and windows. Pythagorus Solar Windows include horizontal solar electric cells without blocking the view.

 Insulation

  • Amorim Expanded – Cork Boardstock Insulation: FSC certified Cork Board is a 100% natural, rigid insulation material with R-3.6 per inch efficiency. It offers excellent acoustic control, is highly durable, has moderate vapor permeability, and meets fire-safety requirements without flame retardant chemicals.
  • Engaurd is a simple batt insulation that performs similar to fiberglass but it’s made from 50% recycled PET plastic and uses a lot less energy to produce.The stiffer insulation is hydrophobic and fully recyclable.

Composite

Ecor is a strong, versatile construction product created from a composite of largely recycled and underutilized natural components. Up to 4 times stronger, it is designed to serve as an environmentally sensitive, and superior, alternative to materials such as plywood. It can be used for everything from furniture to stage construction.

Recycled Surface

Bramal: A much softer surface is available from Bramel – it’s made from 50% reused tires and it can cover just about any substrate. It can be used on roofs to shed water, on bridges to protect steel, and tests are underway to use Bramal as a low-impact sidewalk in front of buildings.

Water Conservation

Cyber Rain smart irrigation controllers uses local weather data along with plant, sprinkler, soil, slope, and sun exposure data to calculate evapotranspiration (ET) and provide just the right amount of water to maintain the health of different plant species and avoid overwatering.

Heat & Moisture Performance

  • Proglaze ETA Engineered Transition Assemblies from Tremcoc: Building enclosures are complicated assemblies of multiple products that have to work together in controlling moisture and heat flow. Proglaze is 60% recycled and designed to bridge assembly gaps between windows and other wall openings and has 0 g/1 VOC content and are Greenguard Children & Schools certified.
  • Wufi software calculates heat and moisture transfer in multi-layer building components exposed to various climate conditions, and has been used in the development of smart vapor retarders. Among WUFI’s uses are assessing the performance of roof or wall assemblies in driving rain; estimating the drying time of masonry with trapped moisture; predicting the impact of repairs; and sensitivity analysis for material substitutions. 

Greening codes, municipality LEED mandates, and related-product integration will change the future of building products.  Brand viability is dependent on how well your products perform against these trends.

It’s not too late to be an innovator. If you’re not already thinking green, take the first steps:

  1. Understand what you’re already doing that is green and start talking about it.
  2. Know how you measure up against the competition.
  3. Identify one small area of achievable change and make it happen.

By doing so, you’ll be taking an important step forward in ensuring brand relevance and profitability for years to come.

This article was based on BuildingGreen.com’s list of Top Ten Green Products” and Inhabit.com columnist Andrew Michler’s article, ”The Best Sustainable Building Products from Greenbuild”.

Marketing Building Products: Top Ranked Green Products for Homeowners

marketing green home building products

Be an early adopter and you’ll gain valuable brand recognition, industry acceptance and homeowner buy-in.

Homeowners will be captivated by the “new factor” and the social “do good” qualities of green products.  Green translated for manufacturers, means stricter building codes and increased production costs.  Green translated for homeowners surfaces as buying benefits like energy efficiencies and health and eco safety.  While homeowners have big buy-in for green products, companies who can prove return on their investment will get not only buy-in, but buy-ing.

Get inspired and learn from two leading sustainable publishers, BuildingGreen and Inhabit.

BuildingGreen, is an independent publishing company committed to providing acurate, unbiased and timely green design information.  BuildingGreen also publishes Environmental Building News, BuildingGreen Suite online tools, GreenSpec directory of products, and LEEDuser web tools.

Inhabit is a weblog devoted to the future of design, tracking the innovations in technology, practices and materials that are pushing architecture and home design towards a smarter and more sustainable future.

Here are my favorites chosen from these editors’ top picks at this year’s USGBC Greenbuild Conference – the source for the most innovative green building products.

Paving

  • Filterpave is a paving material made from boldly colored, ground glass that is fused together with an acrylic binder. Available in several colors, installation is the same as traditional concrete. Water easily filters through the surface creating the added benefit of a storm water management effect.
  • Grasscrete is a new drivable grass and concrete paving system that adds a soft edge to hardscaping and reduces heat island effects.  The surface is like a big egg carton made from paper board that’s filled with concrete and then pockets can be planted with grass or filled with gravel.

Energy Efficient

Big Ass Fans: Haiku ceiling fans use 2-30 watts, significantly exceeding Energy Star requirements. The elegant, 60-inch-diameter blades are made from either an advanced composite material in black or white, or hand-finished, laminated bamboo in a caramel or cocoa finish.

Window Glazing

LoE-i89 glazing from Cardinal Glass Industries: A new coating from Cardinal Glass is a sputtered indium tin oxide hard-coat that can be installed on an exposed surface allowing two low-e coatings on a double-glazed window to perform like a triple-glazed window.  High light transference makes the coating perfect for solar gain applications.

Insulation

  • Amorim Expanded – Cork Boardstock Insulation:  FSC certified Cork Board is a 100% natural, rigid insulation material with R-3.6 per inch efficiency. It offers excellent acoustic control, is highly durable, has moderate vapor permeability, and meets fire-safety requirements without flame retardant chemicals.
  • Engaurd is a simple batt insulation that performs similar to fiberglass but it’s made from 50% recycled PET plastic and uses a lot less energy to produce.The stiffer insulation is hydrophobic and fully recyclable.

Reclaimed Wood

Viridian Wood processes FSC-certified reclaimed wood from shipping pallets, crates and packing materials and then creates flooring, tabletops, paneling, veneers, and other products for use in commercial and residential buildings. Viridian wood is made without chemicals or toxic adhesives and meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) standards.

Water Conservation

  • Cyber Rain smart irrigation controllers uses local weather data along with plant, sprinkler, soil, slope, and sun exposure data to calculate evapotranspiration (ET) and provide just the right amount of water to maintain the health of different plant species and avoid over watering.
  • GeoSpring hybrid electric water heater from GE: Beginning in 2015, electric water heaters, over 55 gallons will have to use a heat pump earn to energy factors of nearly 2.0.   GE’s newly redesigned GeoSpring 50 gallon water heater has an energy factor of 2.35 in hybrid mode, and has a first-hour rating of 63 gallons.

As building codes continue to green, the pressure is on for building product manufacturers to find new ways to be green and code compliant.  Equally important to your success is how you translate those regulations in to buyer benefits like efficiency, safety and return on investment equations.

If you’re a building product manufacturer and you’re not already thinking green:

  1. Take a first step and identify one small area of achievable change and make it happen.
  2. Know how sustainable your product line is and how it compares to the competition.
  3. Start talking about it with your buyers.

By doing these things, you’ll be taking important steps forward in ensuring that your brand stays relevant and profitable for years to come.

This article was based on BuildingGreen.com’s list of “Top Ten Green Products” and Inhabit.com columnist Andrew Michler’s article, ”The Best Sustainable Building Products from Greenbuild”.
Photo Credit: Eleventh Earl of Mar via photopin cc